Motherboard swollen caps-How to check your desktop computer for failed capacitors

While it may be true that we go through a lot more motherboards at PCstats. This particular Slot A motherboard was recently retired from active duty because the computer it was in became unstable, and too unreliable. This system had in fact been reinstalled a few times when no physical capacitor failure was visible, but this last time a quick inspection within the case had shown disastrous events underway. After ripping the computer apart to try an diagnose the strange problems which seemed to point to Windows instability issues, or possibly bad memory or hard Drive, we found half the low-ESR Equivalent Series Resistance aluminum capacitors on the board in pretty bad shape. At the time we chocked up the failure to a bad on-board power supply circuit and just assumed something, possibly a MOSFET, had partially failed and was overloading subsequent components.

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

The first photograph above shows Chhsi capacitors which have failed on an MSI board. The self-healing of the oxide layer inside the electrolytic capacitor can't take place. As it is known that aluminum can be dissolved by alkaline liquids, but not that which is mildly acidic, an energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy EDX or EDS fingerprint analysis of the electrolyte Motherboard swollen caps the faulty capacitors was made, which detected dissolved aluminum in the electrolyte. This is not true IF it is a proper anti-static Jesse samuelson. So a capacitor which has failed can show bulging at the top.

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Second, I believe ripple current is Sext tit fuck of Motherboars effect of Motherboard swollen caps variations than output. Motherboard swollen caps Japanese manufacturer Rubycon became a leader in the development of new water-based electrolyte systems with enhanced conductivity in the late s. I've heard of the little yellow ones dying, although since swoplen look OK, i'd leave them alone. Full story currently available on Torontostar. Failed e-caps with well known brands may have had failures not related to defective electrolyte. Retrieved Fortunately on a motherboard many of the capacitors are in parallel so that one or two going fault do not cause the Motherboard swollen caps to fail, whether it does or not is down to luck. What type of components would be most sensitive to swollwn failure? As for long term reliability, I have even less expectations, but then I am old. Black Jacque. More by the author:. At the beginning of the s, some Japanese manufacturers started the development of a new, low-ohmic water-based class of electrolytes. Desolder the bad capacitor s from the board. Can I replace a uf 6. Seduce a girl the time, the whole faulty capacitor issue had more or Mothebroard died down, but this got us to thinking again.

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  • The capacitor plague was a problem related to a higher-than-expected failure rate of non-solid aluminum electrolytic capacitors , between and , especially those from some Taiwanese manufacturers, [1] [2] due to faulty electrolyte composition that caused corrosion accompanied by gas generation, often rupturing the case of the capacitor from the build-up of pressure.
  • The PC, once powered up, is very stable: it hasn't froze once since I upgraded everything.
  • While it may be true that we go through a lot more motherboards at PCstats.
  • This instructable will show you how to diagnose and repair bad capacitors on computer circuitry saving you money on new appliances and preventing landfills from filling up.
  • The author is replacing the caps on an Abit VP6, but I assume that the technique works for other boards.

Is your desktop computer running slower than normal? Does it randomly or constantly freeze up or restart? Or maybe it doesn't boot to the operating system or even boot at all.

If so, your computer could have a failed capacitor. Every computer repair shop has their own set of standard procedures and we are no different. The very first thing we do when someone brings in a desktop computer is check for blown capacitors. With a quick visual inspection, we can spot a costly computer repair. And you can too. Here's how to inspect your desktop computer for failed capacitors. Now before you go and take your system apart, let's take a look at the symptoms of a failed capacitor.

Does your computer have any of the following problems? Visual differences between water based and polymer based electrolyte capacitors. There are primarily two type of capacitors used on computer circuit boards motherboards, graphics cards , etc.

The majority of failures I have seen are with water-based capacitors, but polymer-based do fail too, just not as often. During the years of thru , millions of faulty water-based capacitors were produced by some Taiwanese manufacturers. The electrolyte will evaporate and turn into a gas, thus bulging the case, and in some cases, leaking. Top view of a row of failed capacitors Side view of a failed capacitor.

The following can be performed with the computer in-place, provided you have enough room. If not, you will have to move your computer to a location that does. Take a photo of where everything goes first, then completely disconnect all cables that attach to it.

If you do find a bad capacitor, there are three 3 options. First thing, if your computer is still operable, backup your data ASAP see links below. There are a lot of factors involved in deciding which option to choose, age of the system and cost being the two major ones. For more information on failed capacitors: Capacitor plague - Wikipedia.

For more information on how to replace failed capacitors: Recapping your own motherboard - Badcaps. Googled this article. Computer running slow so looked at the mainboard. Every big capacitor has blown or appears going bad 3 of 3. Will replace the critters Notify me when new comments are added. Cancel reply to comment. Here at Geeks in Phoenix , we take pride in providing excellent customer service.

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Archive Contact Sign in Subscribe. How to check your desktop computer for failed capacitors Symptoms of bad capacitors Now before you go and take your system apart, let's take a look at the symptoms of a failed capacitor. Types of capacitors Visual differences between water based and polymer based electrolyte capacitors There are primarily two type of capacitors used on computer circuit boards motherboards, graphics cards , etc. Checking for bad capacitors Top view of a row of failed capacitors Side view of a failed capacitor The following can be performed with the computer in-place, provided you have enough room.

Power down your computer and Remove the power cord from the back of the power supply in-place inspection or Disconnect all cables relocated inspection Open the case. Remove any obstructions, like fan shrouds, so you can view the entire motherboard and other add-in cards. Using a flash light, visually inspect all capacitors on the circuit boards motherboard, graphics card, etc. You may need to physically remove some of the add-in cards to inspect them. Visual symptoms include: Bulging or cracking of the vent on top Casing sitting crooked on board as the base may be pushed out Electrolyte that may have leaked out on to motherboard rust colored Case is detached or missing What to do if you find a bad capacitor If you do find a bad capacitor, there are three 3 options.

Repair the motherboard You can replace the bad capacitor yourself see link below or have a trained professional do it for you. Replace the motherboard EBay is a great place to find a refurbished motherboard. Replace the computer If you've been looking for an excuse to get a new computer, you just found one. Or maybe two or three. For more information on failed capacitors: Capacitor plague - Wikipedia For more information on how to replace failed capacitors: Recapping your own motherboard - Badcaps.

Tags : computer repair. Related posts How to tell if your desktop computer power supply has failed In this article, I show how to test a desktop computer power supply. How to add an expansion card to your desktop computer In this article, I show how add more functionality to your desktop computer by installing an expansi What you can do with an old laptop or desktop computer Here's a few ideas about what you can do with old laptop and desktop computers, working or not.

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I bet any amount of money that if you were to remove that capacitor and check it's measured capacitance against it's marked values, it would be out of tolerance by probably a good margin. Is it possible the AGP card finally put enough of a draw on the board to kill the caps? Given the failure mode of these things, the capacitance of them goes to 0, and they turn into nice big resistors. But if you've been following CPUs in computers, they used to be 5Vdc, dropped to 3. Latest: MeO 1 minute ago. Retrieved 5 February But output AC loading will affect it.

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps

Motherboard swollen caps. Покупки по категориям

At worst they will burst inside the case and cause the motherboard to fail probably the CPU as well. I have been keeping an eye on them since February and they're no worse that's for sure. I wonder if they could have been damaged from the old PSU if it wasn't providing good voltages. Anyway, I really like this PC. It's great for playing old games and is fast and responsive to use I've got a laptop for newer games like Crysis.

If I have to do anything, then I'll replace the motherboard. But at the moment it doesn't seem like it is reseting the BIOS any more frequently, if anything, it's becoming less frequent. So I'd really like to keep it as it is, unless it is definately a sign that it will fail If you replace the motherboard, so long as it's an OEM copy you bought yourself and not tied to a specific manufacturer, you just need to call MS's activation number and explain and they're give you a new key to use.

I guess if you've got another computer, your laptop, you can afford a failure in that old desktop. So if you want to take the risk that's fine.

I would not leave it running unattended however like overnight while you sleep or while out at work.

Time to cascade it I say. Alkaline leakage will damage the mobo over a short period, and seeing as the mobo is obselete along probably with associated hardware that matches to it it's time to go shopping! After ripping the computer apart to try an diagnose the strange problems which seemed to point to Windows instability issues, or possibly bad memory or hard Drive, we found half the low-ESR Equivalent Series Resistance aluminum capacitors on the board in pretty bad shape.

At the time we chocked up the failure to a bad on-board power supply circuit and just assumed something, possibly a MOSFET, had partially failed and was overloading subsequent components. While I'm not an EE, that reasoning seemed to explain why half of the 48 capacitors were blowing themselves up like little aluminum balloons, and the rest weren't.

Fast forward a few months and while reading through the Toronto Star newspaper it becomes clear that the odd failure we experienced might not be such an isolated occurence. We discussed this issue in the PCstats. If you were to open up a capacitor you would find thin sheets of paper and metal rolled up together.

The entire assembly is then wetted with an aqueous electrolyte solution. However, if the formula is not correctly mixed up, hydrogen gas can apparently build up in the aluminum can with time. The gas causes the hermetically sealed aluminum cans to burst, or partially blow out the rubber end cap. If electrolytic capacitors "dry out" they won't work properly, and that can cause problems with the computer which can be very difficult to figure out.

Just when we'd more or less forgotten about the previous issues, we experienced capacitor problems firsthand again, this time in the form of a FIC AU11 motherboard which had been the base of a previously stable office machine.

It died without warning, and upon removing the board we noticed that 8 of the larger capacitors, specifically four of the GSC 10 volt microFarad capacitors and four of the smaller GSC 6.

Not a good sign. At the time, the whole faulty capacitor issue had more or less died down, but this got us to thinking again. What if the lifespan of the faulty capacitors was coming to an end. It's a complex problem, and the fact that businesses have even been set up to replace faulty mainboard capacitors is an interesting footnote to just how widespread this issue may be as older motherboards begin to show their age. If you know how to solder and read the labels on the aluminum capacitors, it should be possible to replace the capacitors yourself - assuming you can find identical replacements at a local electronics parts supply store.

Aluminum capacitors are relatively large compared to other board mounted components, and in the factories are installed by hand. We'd like to know if you have ever had problems with a motherboard due to blown or leaking capacitors. We have set up a discussion in the PCstats forums , so if you have experienced this issue or know someone who has, let us know. Pictures would be good too.

Bulging capacitors on my motherboard. Should i be worried? | Tom's Hardware Forum

My friend's computer has been acting flakey, especially when he's got a lot of bus-powered USB devices plugged in.

I've narrowed the problem down to either the motherboard or power supply. The power supply is newer and should have plenty of juice to run all of the peripherals in question. I opened up the case and decided to first look for bulging capacitors. This motherboard is an older socket one and I recall that it's probably around the age when the bulging cap problem was big in the marketplace.

I've actually seen what a bulging slightly capacitor looks like though, so even though I can look at pictures online, most of the pics are of worse-case scenarios when the cap has already split or even exploded. I'm going on the assumption then that the motherboard does indeed have this problem and needs to be replaced.

I just wanted a second opinion though: Are these examples of the problem? Here is an example of bad capacitors No, it just looks like he's got a dust problem.

That was my thought as well. That and the fact that all those pictures suck. For the love of god people it's not easy getting a good shot when the light is low and the lens is a 50mm prime, because in order to get the exposure you need to have the aperture open quite high, which results in a small depth of field.

I'm surprised you don't think the bulges in the triangular portions of the cap top indicate anything but I suppose the lack of a uniform bulge across the entire top might be your reason.

So what do you think the problem is? Basically I have checked the RAM and the rest of the system and the problem only seems to manifest itself when my friend has a lot of bus-powered USB devices plugged in. When the only things plugged in are a keyboard and mouse, the system runs fine.

Various voltages seem to be fluctuating as well. What do you think or suggest could be the problem? Ever heard of a flash? This is a good time to use one I'm not seeing a bulge in the top at all. They look pretty normal to me. Might want to check the PSU then. I was using a flash but had to be careful how I was using it-- trying to take a picture of a metal, reflective object when that is the object that needs all the detail is hard. Ever heard of reflections? Yes the other option is the PSU.

My example above is from an Antec power supply that went bad on me I don't see any out-of-the-ordinary bulges, but the PC can use a good dusting.

The dust might be causing a heat issue or a short. It's also possible to find blown VRMs that are partially for fully melted. You say the PSU "should" have enough juice?

I should quit drinking, I should stop going to strip clubs and spend more time with my girlfriend, fat. So how about a diffinative output for that PSU? Or even better a model number? Also how many drives and what type are on the system? Dead caps are obviously dead, like the pic from Wrakkenruan and even one or two like the one in the lower left of center on a motherboard won't kill it outright.

I don't see any that are bulging. Again, according to BadCaps. If you're going to replace capacitors, replace the big ones around the CPU and the ones in the memory slot voltage regulator and video slot regulator. Those caps should be near chips or transistors with pins on one side and a soldered tab on the opposite side, and they may be near coils donut or encapsulated squares.

I will have to open the power supply in that case. Kind of a pain though as I gave him back his computer, since of course I could not find anything wrong with it. If he already has it back, then go over there with a known good PSU and swap it out. Test the system for a while and if it doesn't display the problem at that point, let him know that your suspicions were correct and that a new PSU is on the way. A general rule of thumb for bulging caps is to run your finger lightly over the top of the cap.

If it's bulging you should feel it - it'll be convex as opposed to flat. When I pushed them down, an ooze or hissing noise would occur. Your caps are all FINE!!! I don't know if anyone mentioned it or not, but opening up a PSU can be very dangerous. Some of the capacitors inside hold quite a lot of charge, so be very careful! If the caps are bad inside, throw it out.

Don't risk your life recapping it. As usual, others are welcome to disagree, but I wouldn't chance it. Thanks for all the input folks. I have the computer back now, and a new motherboard and power supply. I'm going to open up the original power supply before I crack the wrapping on the new one just in case there's no obvious problem inside.

I don't intend to try to replace any caps inside nor attempt to discharge the caps in the supply; I'm not that much of an idiot.

I have opened power supplies before but don't foresee electrocuting myself. I will probably use my multimeter to confirm the voltages from the 20 pin ATX connector, but I realise that without a load test there is no way to see what the power supply is really doing. Just to correct a misconception This is not true IF it is a proper anti-static strap.

It MIGHT be dangerous to do this is you are in the habit of wrapping a conductor around your wrist in lieu of a proper wrist strap but a proper anti-static strap has series resistance build into it to prevent people from accidentally killing themselves.

A proper one has a 1 million ohm resistor inline to ensure proper SLOW discharge in the event of a shock. I remembered that I had an older ATX power supply with the 12V P4 connector, which was what I needed so I decided to give a whirl with it before taking apart anything else. I booted the machine with both the original power supply and my tester, off of an Ubuntu Linux CD. I installed mbmon and looked at the output in both cases, and it was identically wrong. All of the voltage output was wrong, but I'm not sure if that was the sensor just not working or if it's indicative of some kind of motherboard failure.

Since the output was wrong even with a known good power supply, I'm not sure what else could be the problem. The thing is, I still wasn't able to get the machine to misbehave in a serious way while booted into Linux, even after plugging something into almost every single port on the computer basically everything except parallel and serial ports, but my friend doesn't have anything plugged in there at home either.

I guess I'll see what a new motherboard does then, and leave this new power supply in its wrapping so that I can return it without a restocking fee if the machine works well with his existing supply. If you have any other suggestions or ideas, I'd love to hear them.

You can discharge a PSU pretty easily, by flipping the power off switch on the back of a PSU and then pushing the power button. The fans should turn for a second and then go off. Fully discharged. EDIT: ya know, unless I've been doing it wrong. I was always told not to use a strap with a power supply. Other parts like a motherboard, yes, but my flat panel TV documentation says not to when handling the power supply. It also says to grab the unit by the edges only.

However, the TV PSUs don't have a case around them; it's possible to touch the capacitor leads if you're not careful. Though continuum says it's safe and he's usually right , I would be wary of depending on a tiny resistor for protection. That resistor is there to protect the equipment from static shock, not to protect me from thousands of volts of current. Even though the resistor should slow the current, I'm reluctant to depend on it to prevent a shock to me.

The resistor could burn up under enough current and the current could jump the gap. I'll concede it's rather unlikely. As an aside, I once took apart a camera when I was a kid, and I kept getting shocked.

My mother finally got wise when I kept saying "ouch" and took the camera away. It turned out I was repeatedly zapping myself with a volt flash capacitor. Hurt like hell. Another time, my college roommate opened up a PSU because the computer it was from wouldn't power on, and it shocked him so bad he threw it into a wall. We threw that one out and ordered a new one. That said, I wouldn't even screw with the inside of a PSU; just replace it and be done with it. I decided to use my multimeter to test the 20 pin ATX power connector.

I shorted pin 14 with a ground pin to cause the PSU to power up without being plugged into the motherboard. I tested each lead and discovered they were all within the allowed range for ATX power supplies. The VDC line was just above the minimum rating, however.

It was reading as Still, everything seemed fine overall and nothing stood out as being particularly wrong. Boring stuff.

Motherboard swollen caps