Bahamas demographic model transition-Demographic transition and population aging with Caribbean nation states | SpringerLink

Journal of Cross-Cultural Gerontology. This paper considers the role which the demographic parameters of fertility, mortality and migration will play on the pace and concentration of aging within the context of a developing region. This paper examines the demographic transition and analyzes historic and projected data for the development patterns of the anglophone nation states of the Caribbean. The paper then goes on to consider shifts in the structure of population at older ages due to the decline in fertility and mortality and points to some of the policy considerations that these relatively small and newly independent states will need to deal with during the next several decades. Unable to display preview.

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

The year will mark a turning point: as the demographic dividend comes to an end, the number of older persons will begin to rise sharply, and will come Bahamas demographic model transition exceed the number of unders inthat is, 20 years after the dividend expires 30 pp. Population projections. Bongaarts J. O'Grady-LeShane, R. Latin America and the Caribbean Demographic Observatory Bahamas Top 19 Cities by Population. Any barriers to continued progress will prevent movement and create stagnant countries, at least in their placement within the Demographic Transition Model.

Glacier sexy kitten. World Population Review

Regardless, stable population growth provides significant advantages for a country, offering Air enema inflation to strengthen its economy as a dsmographic number of its citizens will be in their working years. Asked in Australia What demographic transition stage is Australia currently in? Many new settlers transitipn from Baahamas Southern United States and brought slaves with them to cultivate plantations. Example: poorest developing countries like Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bolivia, sub-Saharan countries such as Niger, Uganda and middle east countries like Yemen, Palestinian Territories are still in stage 2. One of the most common misconceptions about population growth is that Bahamzs population stops growing once mldel level fertility High infant mortality and very low life expectancy. The material on Bahamas demographic model transition site can not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with prior written permission of Multiply. The Bahamas demographic model transition revolution during the 18th century, which brought in systematic cropping patterns and agricultural practices, increased food productivity and yield. Population Education is a national program that provides resources and professional developement for K educators focusing on human population trends and their impacts on natural resources, environmental quality and human well being. Conditions might be different for LEDCs in different parts of the world. Asked in Germany What stage is Germany in the demographic transition model? Asked in Demographics Where is Cameroon on the demographic transition model? Death rates have too been affected by continued advances in medicine and public health.

The world is experiencing unprecedented demographic change 1.

  • DTM depicts the demographic history of a country.
  • Rujuta Patil Jun 18,
  • All Rights Reserved.

The world is experiencing unprecedented demographic change 1. Since the early 20th century, the human population has increased from 2 billion to over 7 billion, and that figure is expected to reach 10 billion by the end of the 21st century 1. Other significant population changes have to do with new and varied fertility patterns including adolescent maternity , mortality, migration, urbanization, and aging.

In this context, it is essential to describe the main features of population trends in the countries of the Americas in order to identify and analyze their implications for health.

The importance of demographic dynamics is two-fold. First, demographic dynamics may be indicative of certain health issues such as trouble preventing, treating, and controlling communicable and noncommunicable diseases in places experiencing rapid, excessive population growth. Second, they can afford an opportunity to overcome such obstacles such as the development potential associated with the so-called demographic dividend. The concept of the demographic transition is a very useful tool for explaining population changes and their regional differences.

The clearest example of such a demographic evolution occurred in the midth century, linked to the economic transformations of industrialization and the modernization of countries that have developed since then 2. These changes took place in Europe, North America, and other places in the 19th and 20th centuries, then began in many developing countries in the midth century 3.

While exceptions can be found, the demographic transition concept is a practical way to analyze recent population trends and projections of future population size 4, 5. There are four main stages in the classical demographic transition model: 1 incipient transition high and relatively stable birth and mortality rates, with low population growth ; 2 moderate transition falling mortality, with a stable or rising birth rate due to improved living conditions, with high population growth ; 3 transition in progress low birth rate and stable mortality, with low population growth ; and 4 advanced or very advanced transition low birth rate and mortality, with population growth that is negligible or even declining 6.

In the Americas, the demographic transition has evolved differently according to geographical location. Historically, there has been a marked difference between the progress made by the countries of North America compared to most countries in Latin America and the Caribbean LAC.

In , the vast majority of countries in Central and South America were about to begin their demographic transition, while the transition was already in progress in Canada and the United States. By then, few countries were still at the pre-transition Bolivia and Haiti or incipient transition stage Belize, Guatemala, Honduras, and Nicaragua. In , these same countries were in the in progress stage, while the rest were in advanced or very advanced stages of transition.

In the LAC countries, birth rate and mortality indicators have changed differently more due to the spread of general technological advances in health than due to sustainable and equitable development and at different rates more quickly than in more developed countries and somewhat independently of the economic, social, and political crises the Hemisphere has experienced for decades 7.

Due to the depth and speed of their population transformations, the LAC countries currently tend to be at the same stage of demographic transition. With demographic transition as a backdrop, this summary discusses how the main changes in population size and structure in the countries of the Americas are related to the drivers behind these changes: fertility, mortality, and migration.

Additionally, future population trends in the Hemisphere are discussed. The information used comes from population estimates and projections by the United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division 8.

For some countries, data come from the United States Census Bureau 9. Data were also used from the PAHO bulletin Health situation in the Americas: basic indicators, for selected years For ease of analysis, the countries of the Region of the Americas have been grouped into subregions and areas.

In , 7. The population of the Americas totaled In terms of subregions, At Brazil, Mexico, and the United States In the last 5 years, the Region added Although these figures denote a sizable absolute increase, they reflect a moderate annual average growth rate 1.

Furthermore, and due to national differences in progress towards demographic transition, there was great diversity in the current growth rate among the countries of the Americas 6, Between and , for example, Cuba had an average annual population growth rate of 0.

Figure 1 shows the total population and average annual growth rates of the countries of the Region. Figure 1. Despite the progressive decline in growth rates, the population of the Region is expected to continue growing for a long time due to demographic inertia, caused by high fertility rates in the past that result in a significant proportion of young people in the population.

As this segment of the population reaches reproductive age, the resulting large number of births tend to surpass deaths for a prolonged period For this reason, although fertility is currently low in LAC, it is foreseeable that the population will not stop growing until the middle of this century.

Demographic variables will continue to have a considerable influence on society since population growth involves a large number of young people and older adults—population groups with different potentials and needs, especially in the sphere of health.

This trend is explained not only by progress toward the demographic transition in these countries, but also emigration. A distinctive aspect of population distribution in the Americas is the impact of urbanization on overall population growth. Despite the high levels of urbanization in our countries and in the rest of the world, cities are expected to continue growing in the coming decades Rapid, unplanned urban growth threatens sustainable development if the necessary infrastructure is not created or if policies are not implemented to ensure an equitable distribution of the benefits of city life.

Governments must set their sights on tapping into the opportunities offered by urbanization, at the same time as they respond to its challenges by implementing long-term policies that allow for sustainable urban growth. This approach includes creating better opportunities for income and employment in urban and rural areas; expanding the infrastructure required for water and sanitation, energy, transport, information, and communications; ensuring equal access to services such as education and health care; developing quality housing and reducing the number of people living in slums; and preserving natural assets in the city and surrounding areas However, the significance of these factors varies according to the size of the units of analysis.

For the world as a whole, the annual increase in population is due to fertility rates that exceed mortality rates. At the global level, and even for large regional aggregates, migration is less relevant. However, when the analysis is done at the country level, the opposite may be true, since migration can have a big impact on changes in the population 1. The most commonly used indicator to analyze this component of population dynamics is the total fertility rate TFR.

This rate is equal to the average number of children that a woman would have by the end of her reproductive period, if she had exhibited the age-adjusted fertility rates recorded by the population of interest, in a given year. One of the best known criteria for classifying countries by TFR is the population replacement level. This value is equivalent to the average number of boys and girls who would suffice to replace both parents in a given population 2.

In the Americas, approximately half of the countries belong to the low fertility group including all of North America plus 20 LAC countries and the other half are in the intermediate group Figure 2. Currently, no country has a level of fertility that can be considered high 4 or more children per woman.

Very few countries have an extremely low level 1. This situation is similar to that of Asia, and differs markedly from what is occurring in most countries of Africa and Europe, which have the highest and lowest levels of fertility in the world, respectively.

Figure 2. The decline in fertility is a widespread, long-term demographic reality. At the subregional level, the highest levels were recorded in LAC, with a rate of The countries of the Region with the highest adolescent fertility rates were the Dominican Republic Life expectancy at birth is the most commonly used indicator to report changes in mortality.

This is defined as the average number of years that a group of newborns would live if the specific age-adjusted mortality rates observed in a population remained constant during a given year. One of the clearest manifestations of the progress made thanks to the Millennium Development Goals MDGs is the increase in life expectancy at birth.

Globally, average life expectancy increased by more than 3 years between — and —, rising from This trend is primarily explained by the effective reduction of infant — Life expectancy in the Region was higher than the global average: in LAC, it was In the LAC countries, there have also been differences in the pace and level of reductions in mortality.

At present, average life expectancy at birth is at levels seen in North America between and Mexico recorded the highest rate However, the same indicator reveals contrasts between more and less advanced countries in each area Figure 3 shows life expectancy in the Region, by country. Figure 3. Countries of the Americas: Life expectancy at birth, — years. The number of international migrants around the world has grown rapidly in the last 15 years.

This number reached million people in , 22 million more than in and 71 million more than in In general, between and , the main areas of Europe, North America, and Oceania have been net recipients of international migrants, while Africa, Asia, and LAC have been net senders, with a volume of net migration that has generally increased over time 8.

Mexico accounts for the second largest diaspora population in the world, that is, the largest number of emigrants in absolute terms: 12 million people. Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and Dominica. Figure 4. Countries of the Americas: Annual average net rate of migration, — per 1, population. This phenomenon was quite consistent over the various areas. In Brazil, there has been virtually no change 0 per 1, Of note among demographic transformations in the world is the distribution by age: there have never been so many young people as now and, at the same time, it has never been so apparent that we are moving toward an inevitable process of aging.

Just as the number of young people offers an opportunity for economic and social development under certain conditions mainly satisfaction of health and education needs, in a context of full employment , the growth of the older adult population portends new needs, especially in the realm of health and social security.

The age structure of the population is constantly changing due to changes in mortality, fertility, and migration.

This distribution can only be attained when fertility is high and mortality at early ages is moderate. An aging population begins to develop when fertility declines and mortality at older ages is progressively reduced In the different regions of the world, current and expected transformations in the age structure are expressed in the following population pyramids for and Figures 5 to Over time, two patterns are observed: one is the narrowing of the base of the pyramid, concomitant with the decline in the child population, and the other is the widening of the apex to reflect the increase in the proportion of older adults more markedly among women.

The first phenomenon is quite noticeable in Africa and is primarily related to changes in fertility. The second characterizes Europe and North America, which have generally had low levels of fertility and mortality for decades, with population inflows from migration.

Figures 5 to The population age structure in LAC has been between these two extremes. Although the young population 0—19 years has been the largest segment thus far, by the early s, the young adult population 20—39 years is expected to be the largest group. By , this group should be replaced by the adult population 40—59 years , and less than 10 years later, by the older adult population 60 years and over The extraordinary number of young people in the world—3.

Of these, 1.

Ok No Privacy policy. Stage Three: Post-Industrial Revolution late expanding —increase slows down Birth rate falls due to the availability of contraception. As populations move through the stages of the model, the gap between birth rate and death rate first widens, then narrows. The death rate falls below the birth rate, leading to population decline or population aging. What happens to birth and death rates? Death rate: Total number of deaths per one thousand people in a year. Caribbean portal.

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition

Bahamas demographic model transition. What is the Demographic Transition Model?

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Population Characteristics and Trends

The Bahamas is made up of over islands, islets and cays in the Atlantic Ocean. In , the Bahamas has an estimated population of , The Bahamas has an estimated population of ,, which makes it the th most populous country in the world.

The last official census took place in , finding a population of , The capital and largest city is Nassau, with a population of , The next-largest city is Freeport, with a population of about 50, The region was originally inhabited by the Lucayan, a branch of Arawakan-speaking Taino, although they were later shipped to Hispaniola for slavery by the Spaniards, who never colonized the Bahamas. For most of the 16th century, the islands were abandoned.

Afro-Bahamians are nationals with primary ancestry in West Africa. There are also 17, Whites living in the country. European Bahamians number 38, and are primarily descendants of English Puritans and American Loyalists who came to the islands in the 17th and 18th century. The Bahamas is currently growing at a rate of around 1.

At this rate, the country will reach , by The Bahamas currently has a fertility rate of 2 children born per woman, which is slightly lower than the replacement rate. Total population: Estimated to be consistent with the census, and with estimates of the subsequent trends in fertility, mortality and international migration. Home Countries Bahamas. Components of Population Change One birth every 96 minutes.

Cities in Bahamas. Countries Starting with B. How Many People Live in Bahamas? Bahamas Flag. Human Freedom. Personal Freedom. Economic Freedom. Bahamas Population Growth. Source: World Population Prospects Revision. Bahamas Population Density Map. Bahamas Top 19 Cities by Population. Source: GeoNames. Bahamas Population by Year Historical.

Bahamas Population by Year Projections. GeoNames Gazetteer. Growth Rate.

Bahamas demographic model transition