Dirt bike riding in sand-Dirt Bike Sand Riding Tips & Techniques – Dirt Bike Planet

From the outside, riding sand appears graceful and effortless; like floating on a fluffy white cloud of super-forgiving blond dirt, right? So, how do you learn to adapt to your bike squirming around underneath you? What changes do you need to make to your riding technique and forward vision to build your confidence in sandy conditions? And how insanely good does it feel once you learn to tear the bag out of a sandy track? To answer these questions, we enlisted Tasmanian tearaway Matt Phillips, who at just 24 years of age has already firmly established himself as one of the best sand riders in the world.

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

At first you will compensate by squeezing your ibke with enough force to convert the carbon in them to low grade diamonds. Choose your Tires and Adjust the Pressure Getting traction in the sand can be a tricky skill to master, even bioe experienced riders. Please Login Again. Make sure that your bike is properly setup, stand up on the pegs, hang on loosely but Girls next door and sex let gouse your feet, knees and hips to steer, keep your weight centered, stay on the throttle and move around to steer. Trailriding and enduro always throws unexpected curveballs at you, meaning there can be rocks or roots or square-edged bumps on the ideal line. Riring very fit! From straight-cup to Dirt bike riding in sand tires, you have various options for intense hill climbs or pure roosting ability.

Partch heaton nipples. Nathan Watson

Those are the basics — the rest Dirt bike riding in sand up to you. Dirt bike riding in sand M MX rear tire has a very good tread pattern designed to excel in sand and mud. The intermediate terrain version of this tire is very similar to the soft terrain one. Sand riding punishes your bike. A soft tire is generally going to provide better grip and traction on hard surfaces. The compound is designed for both MX and SX tracks. Newer Post Older Post Home. Hard terrain tires are soft. The tires grip well on straights and in corners and thanks to the tread pattern and tire construction, they last fairly long and are resistant to tearing. Pretty good, but not the best. This is a hard terrain rear tire that features a cross-patch tread pattern to maximize cornering traction.

Johnny Rhodes 21 Sep

  • Kevin McMillian Parts.
  • Dirt Bike Riding In Sand.
  • I never used to myself, but that was only because I lacked confidence.

From the outside, riding sand appears graceful and effortless; like floating on a fluffy white cloud of super-forgiving blond dirt, right? So, how do you learn to adapt to your bike squirming around underneath you? What changes do you need to make to your riding technique and forward vision to build your confidence in sandy conditions?

And how insanely good does it feel once you learn to tear the bag out of a sandy track? To answer these questions, we enlisted Tasmanian tearaway Matt Phillips, who at just 24 years of age has already firmly established himself as one of the best sand riders in the world.

When Matty returned to Oz for Christmas, we hooked up with him on some of his favourite stretches of Tasmanian sand and asked the two-time world enduro champ to cough up everything he knows about the enviable art of riding silica. Take it away, Matthew…. In sand, your bike feels very different than it does on hardpack. You need to be mindful that the way you brake and weight your footpegs in sand is also a lot different.

To get sand right, it requires a somewhat premeditated approach. Ideally, you only want to brake once and turn once for a sandy corner. Contrary to what a lot of people think, you can still use plenty of both front and rear brake in sand, but any hard front brake application needs to be made with the bike upright. As you start to tip the bike in, however, you use a fair bit less front brake. And rather than aggressively chopping the throttle in preparation for braking, I like to roll off the gas more progressively in sand.

You want to be slow enough coming into the turn that you can sit reasonably early, get on the gas early, and power your way right through the corner. That in itself tells me that they needed to come in slower to set up better for the turn.

And once they do move to the seated position, I also see a lot of guys sit too far back on the seat. In sand, you always want to be in a strong position on the bike because soft berms will generally give you good traction and help the bike boost out of the turn pretty quickly.

Also, it is important to make sure that your inside leg remains close to the fork leg. First, this means your knees can still squeeze the bike reasonably hard. Keeping your toe pointed and knee slightly bent will also prevent your boots getting snagged.

And you need to lean with the bike to some extent, rather than weighting the outside peg as you would in hardpack to get the tyres to bite. Unlike motocross, where riders will often look to protect the inside line to defend against being passed, trail and enduro is all about finding the best and fastest overall flow and momentum. But in a majority of instances, the fastest way around a sandy corner is by keeping your arc as wide as possible, which means following the berm all the way around the outside at maximum speed.

If in doubt, go with the line that gives you a smooth arc all the way to the exit, which means looking further ahead than you would on hardpack.

Looking ahead also stops you from getting transfixed on the wheel tracks that tend to crisscross most sandy corners. So long as the power is being delivered to the rear wheel, the bike will maintain momentum and a good front-to-rear chassis balance in sand. If you shift down an extra gear and then rev the bike too hard in the soft stuff, it tends to dig trenches and go nowhere. Remember also that you want to be accelerating seamlessly the whole way through the corner.

And the best way to do that is without gear-shifts. Trailriding and enduro always throws unexpected curveballs at you, meaning there can be rocks or roots or square-edged bumps on the ideal line. So how do you square off the corner without losing too much momentum or increasing the risk of a crash? Well, it comes back to technique. Then, by getting off the brakes suddenly, it gives me a small window when the bike is settled and the front-end slightly unloaded. It also requires you to be percent committed.

Because the rear wheel is getting plenty of traction and is unlikely to step out unpredictably at this point, I can afford to keep the bike leant over as I feed on more power. There should be no need to give it a handful of throttle at this stage.

Standing also forces me to extend my vision from about 10 metres in front of me to 50 metres down the next straight. More than any other type of terrain, you need to remain fluid and use your imagination with line selection in sand.

According to Matt Phillips, riders tend to make a few common mistakes in sand. Enjoy the official aftermovie. Damian Smith gives you the essential cheat-sheet to becoming a much better and faster rider on the grass. Who is Colt Nichols you say? Body Position In sand, you always want to be in a strong position on the bike because soft berms will generally give you good traction and help the bike boost out of the turn pretty quickly.

Mid-Turn Line Selection Unlike motocross, where riders will often look to protect the inside line to defend against being passed, trail and enduro is all about finding the best and fastest overall flow and momentum.

Common mistakes made in sand According to Matt Phillips, riders tend to make a few common mistakes in sand. Not looking far enough ahead.

If your vision is just in front of the bike, everything comes at you at a million miles an hour; and your upper body tends to be hunched over, which makes it harder to control the bike. Lifting your vision also helps roll your shoulders back, which puts the weight on the rear, where it needs to be in sand. Not riding in a tall enough gear. But this usually results in the rear wheel digging trenches, or mid-corner gear-shifts that interrupt your flow. Erratic movements. Entering corners too quickly, trying to turn too sharply or being too aggressive on the brakes create a greater risk of losing that all-important momentum in sand.

Changing their bike set-up. But for sandy trail or enduro, I run my standard set-up. Articles , How-to , Riding. Be the first to comment Cancel Log in to post a comment or sign in with Facebook Login with Facebook. News 3 days ago. Yamaha 3 days ago. KTM 3 days ago. KTM 4 days ago. Did you hashtag Transmoto8Hour? Yamaha 4 days ago. Alpinestars 5 days ago. How-To: Shred Grasstrack Damian Smith gives you the essential cheat-sheet to becoming a much better and faster rider on the grass.

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This takes the weight off the rear wheel allowing you to whip it around in a flurry of sand roost. Email This BlogThis! I never used to myself, but that was only because I lacked confidence. The tire boasts tall knobs for traction and has shoulder steps and increased base angle radius for a nice, stable ride. Take refreshments. These Pirelli dirt bike tires have been designed with a new tread pattern that performs well on intermediate to hard terrains.

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand. Subscribe To Dirt Bike Blogger

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How to Ride a Dirt Bike in Sand and Stay Upright and Protect Your Bike.

From beaches to desert recreational areas, there's no shortage of options for planning your next sand-shredding trip. A heightened awareness of your surroundings can also be the ultimate difference maker on how well your sand dune trip goes. Although we all might enjoy a good learning experience, we have a few tips to cover on how to prep your ATV or dirt bike for the sand dunes. These painless recommendations will get your machine ready for the sand, and keep you twisting that throttle without any maintenance interruptions!

That means your engine has to work harder too. An oil change is good practice before a demanding trip to the dunes. While you're attempting to roost your friends and family around you, the rotations per minute RPM on your machine are running higher than normal, resulting in much higher engine temperatures. Giving your dirt bike or ATV proper lubrication will help it perform for you without failure.

The same can be said for your gearbox. These metal pieces that keep your engine and transmission running require a little bit of care in exchange for a whole lot of hard work, so you can have fun shredding up the sand as they turn and burn! Clean airflow is essential to your engine's performance while riding in the dunes.

Not every machine uses the same style of filter, and each version needs a second layer of defense to keep sand out of the system. Plan ahead and stock a few extra filters for every bike or ATV on the trip. Even if you plan on getting into the air box on a daily basis for cleaning, riding with a dust cover or pre-clean filter is a no-brainer.

Sand is just like the food you give a small child: it gets everywhere! No matter how rugged your bike or quad is, you will find sand in places that you never thought possible. Sand might be one of the most abrasive substances your machine will come across in its lifetime. Aluminum is light, but steel stands the test of time.

As the sand quickly blasts your sprocket time and again, you want to have confidence in its ability to last. Getting traction in the sand can be a tricky skill to master, even for experienced riders. For this reason, you might consider throwing some paddle tires on your machine to make life a bit easier. With many types of paddle tires available, it helps to decide whether to get them or not ahead of when and how you plan on riding the dunes. From straight-cup to V-cup tires, you have various options for intense hill climbs or pure roosting ability.

Not everyone wants to throw down their hard earned money for a new set of rubber tires, so making adjustments with the current setup is also an option.

By running your sport tires at the lowest air pressures that keep the bead in place, your machine will float in the sand much easier. Riding on the dunes is one of the most exhilarating activities a rider can experience.

This is where a good flag comes into play. While prepping for your trip, get a bright flag that stands at least 8-feet tall for your machine. Whether it's beaches or the desert, riding in the sand is grueling on your machine.

Happy shredding! Subscribe Me! Delivery options and delivery speeds may vary for different locations Sign In. Please Login Again. Check, Clean and Replace your Air Filter. Lubricate your Chain and Swap your Sprocket Sand is just like the food you give a small child: it gets everywhere!

Choose your Tires and Adjust the Pressure Getting traction in the sand can be a tricky skill to master, even for experienced riders. Mount a Flag. Aftermarket Chain Lube - ml. Add to Cart. Aftermarket Steel Rear Sprocket - 34T. Why Partzilla? Lowest Prices Find a lower price and we'll match.

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Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand

Dirt bike riding in sand