Model railroad bridge plan-Model Train Bridge

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Model railroad bridge plan

Register now! I'm Model railroad bridge plan civil engineer and have decided to start building model bridges as a hobby and want some plans to follow as a start, where did Squirting hall download them from? Most overhead installations use a layer of plexiglass as the roadbed support so you can see the train go overhead. At the time, I didn't have a 3D printer, but now that I do perhaps I can revisit the project. Continue to 2 of 10 below. Around the same time, concrete, instead of stone, started being used for abutments and pier supports. One type is to use the conventional wood ties attached to the bridge structure and the rails are then nailed Model railroad bridge plan the wood ties. Table of Contents Subscribe Digital Editions. The simple bridge could be adapted for a branch line track bridging a small creek or gulley, or for a roadway overpass.

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I have a copy, and I think I bought it not long after that date. Posted by selector on Monday, January 08, PM. Member Diet for good sex life May, 5, posts. Examples: PlanPlan The Intellectual Property License Agreement allows you to print multiple copies for your own personal use;lan well as construct multiple copies or variations, for your personal use, of each Plan purchased. Posted by j. Member since January, 4, posts. Almost any railroad or line you can imagine has at least one style of plate bdidge bridge. Visit ScaleModelBuildings. One of several Model railroad bridge plan railways that ultimately became part of Canadian Northern was the Central Ontario Railway. How to Build a Model Roller Coaster. This example does not represent a specific structure, but takes it's design from the many thousands Model railroad bridge plan similar bridges constructed in the Eastern United States and Canada during the 's. Colors may differ from models shown. A lot goes on behind the scenes at ScaleModelPlans. In their way. Search the Community.

Model train bridges are a very important element of most layouts.

  • I've found a ton of pics.
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I downloaded a full scale train model from the library and then scaled it down to HO size. This bridge is approximately 7' long which would span approximately ' if scaled up. The challenge with this project is finding the right materials to construct it.

Unfortunately, at that size, wood tends to warp over large lengths. Aluminium or perhaps plastic pieces 3D printed would be ideal. Did you use this instructable in your classroom? Add a Teacher Note to share how you incorporated it into your lesson. I never built the model - I had trouble sourcing materials. Aluminum would probably work better. Hey quick question. I'm a civil engineer and have decided to start building model bridges as a hobby and want some plans to follow as a start, where did you download them from?

Reply 4 years ago. Ah ok i thought you downloaded dimensioned drawings. I want to try a suspension bridge to start of with but struggling with dimensions. Can you post pictures of your finished model? I'd love to see it. Reply 4 years ago on Introduction. You know, I hadn't thought of that! At the time, I didn't have a 3D printer, but now that I do perhaps I can revisit the project. Or you could buy scale bridge parts from micro engineering.

Don't reinvent the wheel. Model railroaders have been building bridges like this since the '40s. Even at 7 feet, you are replicating the engineered trusses of the bridge so the wood segments shouldn't really warp or sag. Still, you might want to consider using hollow aluminum or plastic square stock. Architectural models can be built for indoor or outdoor use and the choice of materials and finish would need to be considered. Reply 7 years ago on Introduction.

I looked into using aluminium "U" channel for the long sections, but I couldn't figure out a way to attach the cross-braces. Up to this point, I've only worked in wood. There is one other minor issue the train must curve onto the bridge. If you look at my other Instructable Ledge Train , you can see what I'm talking about. I thought about building the bridge superstructure on top of the board that I have up now, but it wouldn't look as authentic.

Thanks for the recommendations! I have used this stuff called "Alumaloy". It's pretty spendy, cut you don't need that much for this project. I've used it myself for patching holes in an aluminum boat and it works well. Just don't overheat the aluminum or it will turn to liquid.

Copper is pretty flexible, but I think the truss work might add the rigidity you need. Just a thought. Copper would look very nice, but would be heavy and expensive. Thanks for the tip on the "alumaloy" -- I'll check it out. I'm sure that careful construction could overcome the warping issues.

Are you going to try? I would like to. I don't have a planer so I can't mill my own stock. Walnut or oak would be ideal. By skeplin Pine Armory Follow. More by the author:. About: Mad scientist, woodworker, creative evil, artist, tinkerer, father of five creative hooligans.

Add Teacher Note. Did you make this project? Share it with us! I Made It! Reply Upvote. LiamD5 4 years ago. Wow that sounds really cool! I actually designed this one myself by looking at a picture. LiamD5 skeplin Reply 4 years ago. Beagle45 4 years ago. You made it in google sketch up so its a 3d model so why don't you 3d print it.

Beagle45 skeplin Reply 4 years ago on Introduction. PolarExpressSteamer 6 years ago. You could try mini-pop rivets or make out of wood and glued plastic and paint to look like metal gray, weathered rust. Or cover metal rods with wood and paint. Most overhead installations use a layer of plexiglass as the roadbed support so you can see the train go overhead. CementTruck skeplin Reply 7 years ago on Introduction.

Kiteman 7 years ago on Introduction.

The blacksmith shop is shown here in HO scale. It is complicated and massive with many metal rods under tension. Ed Reply. Posted by selector on Monday, January 08, PM. It's This Easy: Place you order

Model railroad bridge plan

Model railroad bridge plan

Model railroad bridge plan

Model railroad bridge plan

Model railroad bridge plan. Model Builder users:

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Arch through-truss bridge model assembly diagram | geertvankesteren.com

A river crossing can provide a dramatic backdrop to a model train set. It's not difficult to create, either. First, study the prototype pictures on the train's box—as well as any additional images you find online. Then take these things into account during your planning process:. Constructing a realistic bridge scene begins with placing your bridge and then designing all the other elements around it.

So go back to your prototype photos and choose a style of bridge that suits you. If you're committed to building an exact replica of a specific bridge, you may need to start from scratch. The subject of this article is a small steel bridge spanning Raccoon Creek, a small tributary of the Ohio River near Monaca, Pennsylvania. Just upstream, the former Pittsburg and Lake Erie RR Ohio River Bridge is much more impressive and well documented, but would be a tremendous modeling project in any scale.

This relatively tiny bridge on a connecting branch line is suitably sized for the typical model railroad. While ground-level photos of the bridge are hard to come by, satellite images available online provide enough details and perspective to capture the look of the structure. Aside from capturing the basic shape, replicating the side walkways and piping are essential to fully capture the flavor of this structure. Begin with two Atlas Warren Truss Bridge kits.

Cut and splice the basic structures to fit the exact length and height you need. Special attention should go into supporting the bridge adequately and giving the tracks leading to it a strong foundation.

With the bridge dimensions predetermined, you can prepare a space that's just the right size. A good backdrop delineates a river from a lake. And a river stretching toward the horizon adds a sense of distance to any model railroad. However, capturing that perspective requires either a very large layout or, in this case, a backdrop.

Adding a backdrop is really two projects in one. First, the backdrop must be built. Then, it must be supported. The styrene curves easily with the back of the platform at the river's end.

Painting a backdrop is one of the most daunting tasks for beginner hobbyists. Even still, it's not as hard as you think. Even without any foreground scenery, the addition of your backdrop will completely change the way you look at your railroad. If you're not convinced you can pull off the paint job, enlarged photographs can also be used.

Abutments and piers support the bridge and tie the model to the scenery. Poured concrete structures can be recreated with commercial castings or by using wood scraps. Modeling the flow of water starts below the surface.

Before installing the water, a riverbed must be prepped. Using brown and black looks more realistic than blue unless you are modeling a seaport scene. You can also model the bottom of a shallow stream or tributary with dirt and rocks. With Plexiglas, there is nothing to pour, so the results are easier to control. However, cutting the Plexiglas can be challenging and messy. Riverbank scenery begins with a frame.

While there are many ways to make hills and mountains, hardshell techniques are common and easy to learn. Again, refer to your prototype photos to determine slopes, contours, and colors.

Note where the ground extends above the track level to help correctly place the railroad and the bridge in the scene. Model Train Bridge Scene. Continue to 2 of 10 below. Planning the Bridge Scene. Then take these things into account during your planning process: Take note of riverbanks and specific bridge types and supports in the examples you find. Think vertically and plan to add scenery above the tracks as well as below it. Make your bridge look real—as if it's planted into the earth—by planning for proper abutments and foundations.

Plan out your color scheme and source good paint for the longevity of both the train and its backdrop. Continue to 3 of 10 below. Choosing the Right Bridge. Continue to 4 of 10 below. Benchwork for Bridges. Provide for the bridge space by leaving a gap in the sub-roadbed.

With the dimensions of the bridge already known, a plywood river base—slightly wider than necessary—can then be screwed directly to the girders.

Install risers on either side of the bridge and trim the sub-roadbed to the exact length, making sure the bridge fits neatly in between without gaps. If necessary, you can trim the roadbed more during the next step. Continue to 5 of 10 below.

Creating a Backdrop for the River Scene. You're creating a river, not a waterfall. Keeping the waterline low makes the perspective more believable. Avoid direct lines of sight. This also forces the viewer to change vantage points to take in the whole scape. It can make the railroad seem larger, too. Try blending the colors of the backdrop. And always paint the sky, first—day or night. Once that's done, you can easily add the horizon and foreground details.

The last layers painted should be the details closest to the front. Continue to 6 of 10 below. Supporting the Span With Abutments and Piers. This provides a ledge to support the bridge. Create two winged walls made from additional strips of luan, angled at approximately 45 degrees on top. These walls should angle back from the center section and the adjoining edges can be beveled using a disc sander. Each of the winged walls should be specially cut to fit the scene, based on the prototype photos.

Then, glue the pieces to the roadbed supports and the base, being sure to keep them perfectly plum. Height is a critical dimension, so make sure the piers will fit under the supports of the bridge without gaps. Determine the width of the piers by matching them to the width of the bridge itself. Then bevel the front of the upstream ends of the piers.

All of the cuts should be made with a band saw or a small hand saw. Any areas that reveal plywood or other blemishes can be covered with a thin coat of spackle. With the bridge in place, carefully position the piers and mark their location on the river base.

When finished, paint the wood to look like aged concrete. Continue to 7 of 10 below. Modeling Water. Fill any joints, knots, or other blemishes with drywall compound. A light coat of compound over the entire riverbed will help hide wood grain.

Blend the colors to provide a gradual change from shore to shore. Continue to 8 of 10 below. Modeling Water With Plexiglas. Use a band saw with a thin blade and move quickly so you don't melt it. Once the Plexiglas is cut to shape, paint the edges black to help them disappear into the surrounding scenery. When the paint is dry, set the Plexiglas in place. Bring in the piers and bridge for another test fit. If all looks good, glue the piers in place and seal the edges of the Plexiglas with clear caulk.

Continue to 9 of 10 below. Adding Riverbanks. Cardboard strips cut from old packing boxes can be used to create a web to support the plaster. Foam, newspaper, or wire screen material can also be used. When using cardboard for scenery supports, cut strips perpendicular to the sandwiched corrugation i. This yields more flexibility and stronger strips. Use hot glue to join the strips, holding them in place with clothespins or spring clamps until they dry.

It is easy to visualize and modify the shape and contours of the scenery at this stage.

Model railroad bridge plan

Model railroad bridge plan