Openwork lace insertion pattern-Knitting Patterns for Lace Collars, Edgings and Insertions » geertvankesteren.com

But besides Venetian, French, English, Chantilly, Brussels, Sedan point, names familiar to every one, there are all kinds of other laces, likewise of great antiquity, and named as the above are, after the country they belong to. As it would be impossible in these pages to give a comprehensive account of them all, we have restricted ourselves to such as seem more especially suited to the amateur, to whom needlework is a mere recreation and pastime. Worked like the above-named entirely with the needle, but much less elaborate and minute in character and workmanship, they are quicker and easier to make and we are sure that by the help of the directions that accompany the illustrations, any careful worker will be able to imitate them without difficulty. C [A] or Cordonnet 6 fils D. C, Cordonnet 6 fils D.

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Edging and Insertion for White Guest Towel. Brussels ground fig. Bartle Lace. Antique hem-stitch. Shell Washcloth Edging. When you have drawn up the stitch, put the Gay bck in, one thread further on, and take up two threads. The cut edges, from bar to bar, are hem-stitched on both sides, leaving four threads of the stuff between. The arcs are worked over three carefully laid threads, carried across from the middle of one bar to the middle of the bar at right angles to it, the wheels on the other hand are Openwork lace insertion pattern and finished at the same corner. The two different kinds of open-work.

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Light lace pattern with shells. Be the first to upload Opework own image for this pattern! By viewing these patterns you are agreeing to respect the copyright of the designers who allow their work to appear in this collection 2, 5, 8, 9 Lace. Many people prefer sport style of clothing without complicated patterns Medical humiliation stories details. We were unable to sign you up - please try again. Alma Lace. Advanced Openwork lace insertion pattern lace pattern. Cowrie Shell Insertion. No, all images must be uploaded to Prime Publishing. Like this: Like Loading Do not share:. This free crochet pattern can be made with any soft worsted weight yarn.

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But besides Venetian, French, English, Chantilly, Brussels, Sedan point, names familiar to every one, there are all kinds of other laces, likewise of great antiquity, and named as the above are, after the country they belong to.

As it would be impossible in these pages to give a comprehensive account of them all, we have restricted ourselves to such as seem more especially suited to the amateur, to whom needlework is a mere recreation and pastime. Worked like the above-named entirely with the needle, but much less elaborate and minute in character and workmanship, they are quicker and easier to make and we are sure that by the help of the directions that accompany the illustrations, any careful worker will be able to imitate them without difficulty.

C [A] or Cordonnet 6 fils D. C, Cordonnet 6 fils D. Pillow lace and the necessary articles for its manufacture. Various articles are required for the making of pillow lace; in the first place a cushion or pillow, then bobbins and a winder, parchment patterns, pins and a pricker.

The lace pillow figs. The long sides are firmly sewn together and the short ones turned in with a narrow hem through which you run a cord to draw them up. A disc of stout cardboard is put inside the case after you have gathered up the one end; you then stuff the case as full as possible with bran, sawdust or horsehair, lay a second disc of cardboard in at the top and draw up the other end.

These pillows are then put into cardboard boxes with rather high sides, or into a kind of basket, weighted at the bottom, to keep it firm and steady. Pillows of this most primitive kind have the great advantage of being perfectly easy to make. The cylinder is movable so that you can go on working without interruption. The board should be covered, first with a very thick flannel or Bath coating and then with a fine dark green flannel or cloth.

This rod should be covered, in the first place with a thick layer of tow and then with flannel or cloth. On the left side of the cylinder is a cog-wheel and a metal spring is attached to the board, by means of which the wheel is prevented from turning the wrong way.

In Normandy a kind of stuffed box is used instead of a pillow. This cylinder scarcely projects above the stand, a second groove in the back edge receives the lace as it is worked off the cylinder. The pillows used for Valenciennes lace are of again a different construction, but as it is not our intention in the present work to describe the finer kinds of lace it appeared superfluous to give any illustration of the pillows on which they are made. The bobbins fig. As a considerable number are wanted for every pattern and they are apt to slip about and get entangled in inexperienced hands, they are now to be had with the handles weighted with lead to steady them and counteract any independent motion of their own.

We cannot help again laying great stress on the importance of seeing that the size of the bobbins and the number of the cotton be well assorted to the kind of lace. The winder fig. This stand has to be firmly screwed to the table and the bobbin is squeezed in between the two little rods fitted into the supports at the left end of the stand; one of these rods serves as the axle to the little wheel, the other can be drawn in and out and fitted to the length of the bobbin.

When the bobbin is fixed in its place, you take the thread in the left hand and wind it round it, turning the wheel with the right hand from right to left in the direction indicated by the arrow. The thread is wound round the handles of the bobbins that are used for making very fine lace, and a wooden shield that is so contrived that you can slip it over the handle prevents the thread from getting soiled.

Stoppage of the thread at the end of the bobbin fig. This loop is formed by taking the bobbin in the right hand, the thread between the fourth and fifth fingers of the left hand and laying it away from you round the left thumb; then lifting up the bottom thread with the second finger of the left hand you pass the bobbin upwards from below through the loop on the left hand.

Machine for crossing the threads fig. It renders the even crossing of the threads in those parts of a pattern that imitate linen in texture comparatively easy. Two implements like combs, fitting into one another, and movable, are mounted at two thirds of their length on a steel axle. The long teeth have holes bored through the ends, from the sides to the middle of the points and through these holes the threads from the bobbins are passed.

The short teeth also are pierced with transverse holes, through which a needle with the threads threaded in the long teeth resting upon it, is passed. The points of the short teeth are covered with a hollow metal cylinder, split through from end to end, which can be removed when new threads have to be added. When the threads are all on, a small spring is fixed to the two ends of the axle, which is independent of the machine, and the two ends of the spring are introduced into the hollow of the cylinder.

By the pressure you exercise on the teeth in the cylinder, the long teeth change their position, the lower ones rise and the upper ones fall and the threads cross each other, as in a loom. After each movement of the machine, the bobbin that makes the woof must be passed between the crossed threads; the edges are made like those of any other kind of lace. The pattern. The outlines must be clear and exact, as upon that in great measure the perfection of the lace depends.

The drawing transferred to parchment, paper or cardboard, usually of a yellowish tint, should be lined with a very thin stuff such as muslin to prevent its tearing.

A stripe of quadrille, or point paper as it is called, should be laid upon the pattern and then holes pricked with a medium-sized needle at every intersection of the lines. All the curved long lines of the pattern must first be traced upon the point paper with ink and then pricked.

The pattern should be adapted to the thickness of the thread the lace is to be made of; for a coarse lace large point paper should be used and small, for the finer kinds of lace. The pricking of the pattern beforehand is particularly important in the case of the common torchon lace, where the real beauty of the design consists in its regularity; in the case of fine close patterns the pricking can only be done as you proceed. Prickers and holders of the kind represented in fig.

The holes made by the prickers are to receive the pins, stuck in as you go along, round which you form and by which these are kept in their place. The pins must be long, with round heads and of a size suited to the thread.

When your pattern is ready fasten it to the pillow or cylinder as the case may be, stretching it as smoothly as possible and being careful in so doing to fit the lines of the pattern together. If it be too long it must be cut to the required length or you may make the cylinder bigger by wrapping several folds of flannel round it. The value of lace depends not only on the work but on the thread it is made of; all the D. C pour la broderie. Position and movements of the hands fig.

To begin with the simplest operation, making a plait, hang 2 pairs of bobbins to a pin, take 2 bobbins in each hand and lay the right bobbin of each pair over its left fellow and draw up the threads slightly.

Then take the bobbins in the 2nd, 3rd and 4th fingers of the right hand and with the same fingers of the left, lay the 2nd bobbin over the 3rd with the 2nd and 3rd fingers of the left, so that the two middle bobbins are crossed, then take the 4th bobbin in the 2nd and 3rd fingers of the right hand and the bobbin that is now the 2nd, in the 3rd and 4th fingers of the left hand and lay the former over the 3rd, the latter over the 1st.

The plait, fig. On the kind of lace you are making, depends how many pairs of bobbins you will have to use. But as one part of the lace is often made before the other, or you have to put on supernumerary bobbins, you fasten up those not in use on one side with pins, as shown in fig.

Net pattern or ground figs. The pattern, fig. Before proceeding further, it is as well to prepare our readers for the many trials they will have to make, even with the help of the most minute explanations, before they succeed in carrying out the directions; for the whole art of making pillow lace lies in a manual dexterity, only attainable by practice. Even copying the patterns from description is only possible at first in a qua lified sense; the surest way of attaining a satisfactory result is by constantly comparing the drawing and the work in progress and wherever the latter does not correspond with the former, trying at once to rectify the difference.

Linen or cloth ground. As in net passing, you work first from left to right, running 2 threads to and fro in perfectly horizontal lines, so as to produce a ground resembling linen in its texture.

The threads that run to and fro are held at the edge with pins and changed by a half passing, so that the one that was first in going, is first also in returning. The use of the machine for crossing the threads is especially to be recommended in working linen ground; by pressing the short branches of the machine, the position of the threads is changed and the bobbin is pushed through; by a second pressure the second bobbin is driven through, the pin is stuck in for the picot or the cord, when the bobbins are taken back again, four movements being thus all that is required.

Plain hole ground figs. After fixing the pattern, as represented in fig. Hole ground with twisted thread is made in the same way we have just been describing, only that after every half passing enclosing the pin, each pair of bobbins is twisted once. A ground which is worked in this way is stronger than the other. Twisted hole ground is seen again in figs. Wheels in hole ground figs. In fig. Twist the pairs of bobbins again as you did before beginning the wheel and then proceed with the plain ground.

Rose ground figs. Proceed in this manner until the whole ground be finished. Double or ornamental ground figs. C Nos. Tulle ground fig.

Valenciennes ground fig. These plaits are often used in other kinds of lace as well, as may be seen for instance in figs. According to the size of the squares the plaits are made with either 4, 6 or 8 half passings, 2 pairs of bobbins being invariably used. Brussels ground fig. This ground, when it is worked by the hand in very fine thread, takes a long time to do and is therefore often made by machinery.

Eternelle with two rows of holes fig. For a single row of holes, you want 6 pairs of bobbins; for two rows, 7; for three, 9, adding two pairs of bobbins for every additional row of holes. The upper part of fig. Lace with torchon ground and edge in net ground fig. Pillow lace figs. As this pattern is especially suitable for trimming household articles, made of unbleached linen, such for instance as table-covers, curtains and hangings of all kinds, we prefer it made in the thicker thread; even then it looks very well as a trimming for articles of dress.

Pillow lace insertion figs. Begin at point 1 with a plait, fig. Make a plait from point 21 to point Then repeat in the reverse order from points 31, 38, 25, 32 and Armenian lace figs. It may be imitated with capital effect in strong stiff washing materials, such as those indicated in our illustration, either upon a linen or cotton foundation or upon plush or silk.

The thread is first drawn into the edge of the stuff; you then carry it from right to left, determine the length of the squares, and working from left to right make on this first thread as many knots as you have room for. Having covered the first thread with knots, you return to the edge for the next row of knots, but passing your needle this time under three threads. The number of knots should be the same in each row, and the four sides of the square should be all equal.

When the squares are finished they are edged with picots on the two lower sides, as shown in fig.

Yet those who like openwork create miracles of charming shawls, skirts, table cloths and napkins. That is why we gathered a lot of patterns for baby crocheting. You must be logged in to save a pattern. There are so many different crochet lace articles for you to make a choice, such as shawls, mittens, and scarves. Are you sure you would like to report this comment?

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern. Openwork crochet patterns

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Knit Edging Patterns | Knitting Patterns

The above heading comprises every sort of needle-work, to which the drawing out of threads is a preliminary. By sewing over the single threads that remain, and drawing them together in different ways, an infinite variety of patterns can be produced.

Many pretty combinations also, can be made of open-work, cross-stitch, and other kinds of embroidery. Materials suitable for open-work. C, No. C, Nos. C Nos. The two different kinds of open-work. Single open-work Punto tirato. Single hem-stitch fig. Fasten your thread in to the left, and work your hem from right to left, taking up three or four cross-threads at a time, and inserting your needle, immediately above, into the folded hem, three or four threads from the edge, and then drawing it out.

The same stitch is used for preventing the fringes, that serve as a finish to so many articles of house-linen, from ravelling. Second hem-stitch fig. These stitches, which can be used for the right side also, form a kind of little tress, along the edge of the hem. Ladder stitch hem fig. Complete the hem, as already directed in fig. Double hem-stitch fig. Begin as in fig. Antique hem-stitch figs.

In the old, elaborate, linen needlework, we often meet two kinds of hem-stitching seldom found in modern books on needle-work.

At the necessary depth for forming a narrow hem, a thread is drawn, in the case of very fine textures where the edge is rolled, not laid; then fasten in the working thread at the left, and work the stitches from left to right.

Passing your needle, from right to left, under three or four threads, draw the thread round the cluster and carry your needle on, through as many threads of the upper layer of stuff, as you took up below, so that the stitch may always emerge from the middle of the cluster.

The needle does not enter the stuff, but is carried back at once, from the outside, and put in again between two clusters of threads. Slanting hem-stitch figs. The loop must lie in front of the needle. When you have drawn up the stitch, put the needle in, one thread further on, and take up two threads. Double-rowed ornamental seam figs. On the right side the stitch is straight fig. Coloured cottons should be used for all the above patterns of hem-stitch, when they are to be introduced into coloured embroideries.

Single three-rowed open-work fig. Make six rows of hem-stitching, as in fig. The second and third, after drawing out six threads, the third and fourth after drawing out eight. The clusters must all consist of an even number of threads. The upper and the lower band of open-work is to be copied from fig. Divide the threads of the perpendicular clusters in two; insert the needle, from left to right, underneath half the second cluster, turn the needle's eye, by a second movement, from left to right, and take up the second part of the first cluster, drawing it under, and at the same time, in front of the first half of the second cluster.

Be careful not to draw your thread too tightly. Open-work with two threads drawn through fig. Open-work with three threads drawn through fig. Overcast both edges with single stitches; draw the clusters together in the middle, as in fig. Clustered open-work fig. The thread, thus drawn through, must be left rather slack. A second row of stitches, similar to the first, and at the same distance from the bottom edge, completes this pattern.

To give it greater strength, you may if you like, work back over the first thread, with a second, taking care to pass it under the knot, which was formed by the first. Double-rowed cluster-open-work fig. Turkish cluster open-work fig. Open-work with darning stitch fig. Insert your needle and thread between two clusters, and pass it, as if you were darning, backwards and forwards over them, until they are encased half way down with stitches.

In so doing, work with the eye of the needle forward, and the point towards your thimble. To pass to the next cluster, take one stitch back, under the one just darned, and bring your thread underneath the threads of the stuff, to the second cluster.

Open-work in three colours fig. Every cross-line of three clusters is to be worked in one colour. The colours may all be different, or you may if you prefer, take shades of the same colour. Open-work insertion figs. Both admit of several colours being used. Open-work insertion fig. The clusters, as they now stand, are bound together in the middle, three by three, with darning-stitches.

The thread must be fastened in and cut off, after each group is finished. At the last stitch introduce the thread slanting, according to the dotted line, pass it under four horizontal and three perpendicular threads of the stuff and draw it out; then over three threads from right to left, and back under the same, from left to right, and out again; over four horizontal threads, and, under and again over, three perpendicular ones; for the next stitch, you again follow the dotted slanting line.

Then make the darning stitch over nine threads, or three clusters. At half their length, you leave out three threads, first on the right, then on the left, whilst in the other half, you, in a similar manner, take in three; so that you have two darned and two undarned clusters, standing opposite each other. Finally, you overcast the single clusters, and connect every two with a lock-stitch, as shown in the accompanying illustration.

Then, make slanting stitches, proceeding out from these, over three, six and nine threads respectively, all three terminating in a perpendicular line, one below the other. For the open-work, twist the thread five times, quite tightly round and round one cluster, bring it to the edge, between the second and third clusters, and connect these by means of six darning-stitches to and fro: join the first and second clusters in the same way by twelve stitches, and finish, by twisting the thread five times round the remaining length of the first cluster.

The second half of the open-work figure is carried out in a similar manner over the third and fourth clusters. Open-work insertion in four colours fig. The outside figures are executed over six clusters, of three threads each, in a dark and light shade alternately of the same colour. Each of the middle figures combines three clusters of the two figures above it, and may be executed, either in a different colour altogether, or in a lighter shade of the one employed in the top row.

The little star in the centre should be worked in dark red, or black. Open-work insertions figs. Begin at the top of the big pyramid, so that the threads which you run in, can be more closely crowded together. In fig. One figure consists of fourteen clusters, of three threads each. Each figure contains eighteen clusters, of three threads each. Open-work insertion with spiders fig. In the middle, the so-called spiders are made, over every group of four clusters. The thread that runs out from the spider, passes over two clusters and under one, and then three or four times, over and under the clusters, as in darning, and so back, under the spider, at the place at which it was drawn in, and then on, to the next four strands of thread.

Three-rowed open-work fig. Each cluster should consist of four threads. The narrow bands between, are to be herring-boned on either side.

The dotted line shows the course of the thread, on the wrong side. Then unite each separate cluster in the middle, with a back-stitch, as shown in the illustration, and finally, join every group of four clusters together, with three stitches, and make a spider in the middle of the open-work, at the point where the threads intersect each other.

Open-work insertion with rings fig. Draw out, from twenty-four to thirty threads. When you have completed two clusters, join them together, by four interlocked stitches; wind your thread three times round the single thread, and sew it over with close stitches. Ornament the two edges with half-spiders. You begin these over two threads, and go on taking in others, to the number of eight. The whole spider in the middle, is made as above described.

Carry the working thread, as shown in fig. Open-work with winding stitch fig. Bind the edges with two-sided stitches, over two, three, four and five threads, respectively. For the middle figures, you must reckon four threads for the clusters, round which the working thread is tightly twisted, eight for the darned clusters, ornamented with picots see fig.

Make a loose spider over the threads, as a background for the rosette. Work the picots in a different colour from the cluster, and the rosettes, likewise, in two colours.

The connecting loops between the figures should be made as you go along, the thread being always carried back into the loop just made. Cutting out threads at the corners figs. The loose threads can be pushed into the turning, and the edge button-holed, as in fig. If however, on the other hand, the stitching be continued without interruption, as indicated in the upper part of fig.

Cut open-work Punto tagliato. Threads, left between others that have been cut out, serve as a foundation on which a great variety of stitches can be worked.

Openwork lace insertion pattern

Openwork lace insertion pattern