Model paint shaker-How to Build a Mini Paint Shaker for Craft Acrylic Paints (2 geertvankesteren.com, 59 ml) ?

Best Answer 9 years ago. My son and I used to do a lot of railroad and auto modeling and we had the same complaint about the paints that we used. So I did some experimenting and came up with a paint shaker that uses a wooden frame, a tin can, three small coil springs and an electric drill. I've attached a couple of drawings that are pretty much self-explanatory. I used a regular kitchen sponge to pad the bottom and some rolled up foam rubber on top to hold the paint containers in place in the can when shaking.

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Hold the small bottles of paint on the vibrating surface and you have the same effect. I just want to thank everyone, to date, for the great ideas - I'm tinkering, as we speak. Thank you everyone for your help. May seem like over kill but I had the main components lying around unused. I think I Nude men poolside what you're proposing - Model paint shaker you expand on it at all? Gigatron Member since January The quietest shaier is actually the badger followed by the tattoo ink mixer. Took a small piece of tinfoil, folded it up, nice and tight, and wedged it between the shajer and handle, to make a new contact surface. I might take my paint, stir it up a little bit, put the cap on tight, and run it through Model paint shaker sgaker, minus the media. I'm assuming you're talking about paints like FolkArt and Apple Barrel.

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This does get paint up onto the cap, but I've always wiped the top of the jar in addition to the inside of the cap with every use, so I've never had problems with stuck lids or dried crunchy things contaminating shaaker paint. Posted by dbarry31 on Saturday, November 24, PM. Quieter and faster operation Equipped with paibt clamps Fully adjustable locking rubber coated clamps offer increased grip while shaking Accommodates pints, quarts, and gallons. I guess I do it old school; I both stir and shake by hand. Paint shaker Posted by kaimuki21 on Saturday, March 6, AM Saw a model paint shaker in Hardcore teenage ass sex hobby supply magazine and thought about using a large electric massager that you buy for your muscle aches and pains. For paint varnish or Model paint shaker and glue. But to know how to use knowledge is to have wisdom. Model paint shaker Moodel Cart Compare. Order Ascending Order Descending. Template By Froo! Gift Certificate Login or Sign Up 0. Micro-mark strainers. Too many models to build, not enough pxint in a lifetime!!

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  • Any questions about painting or applicator bottles be sure to call or email.
  • Saw a model paint shaker in a hobby supply magazine and thought about using a large electric massager that you buy for your muscle aches and pains.
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Best Answer 9 years ago. My son and I used to do a lot of railroad and auto modeling and we had the same complaint about the paints that we used. So I did some experimenting and came up with a paint shaker that uses a wooden frame, a tin can, three small coil springs and an electric drill. I've attached a couple of drawings that are pretty much self-explanatory.

I used a regular kitchen sponge to pad the bottom and some rolled up foam rubber on top to hold the paint containers in place in the can when shaking. I don't have many dimensions because they depend on the materials used to make the shaker.

I used 'C' clamps to secure the shaker to the top of my work bench. Answer 9 years ago. Sounds terrific - I'll give it a try. Don't be surprised if I have some questions for you.

As soon as I see "self-explanatory", I know I'm in trouble. Buy a cheap reciprocating saw Harbor Freight. Epoxy paint tin sized holder to blade. Let'r rip. Thank you everyone for your help. Burf - great design! I ran across another one that's a bit different which you may find interesting. Answer 5 years ago. Sorry for the shoddy art. Be aware that you'll need to make the translation adjustable the amount of distance the can moves in order to make the final action "ideal". I think I get what you're proposing - can you expand on it at all?

I'm a bit engineering-challenged. Hi Mara. Well, I think, from looking below, that burf's images are of much better quality, and the concept may be much better too. The rapid rocking motion starts and maintains a rotation of the paint from top to bottom inside of the can, thereby mixing it. Not much to it really, sorta mimics the manual shaking a person might do. That's where the adjustment comes in. Best answer Burf. I'm assuming you're talking about paints like FolkArt and Apple Barrel.

I've always shaken them by hand-- portable, easy to clean, no tools required. I've also had my kids hand-shake them, since they have more energy than me. But I'll venture a guess that if you're asking to make a "machine", that hand-shaken isn't an option for you. The first thing I thought of was modifying a clamp onto an electric toothbrush, but finding a clamp that didn't interfere with the power button was difficult, and the vibration rate of the toothbrush seemed too high to be really helpful.

Good Luck! Hi SiderAnne - yes those are the paints I'm referring to. Thanks for the suggestion. Yes, I've been shaking them by hand, too. Would rather have a gadget to do the job. Follow Asked by mara Paints come in plastic bottles screw on, pop up cap approx 4" high x 1.

Easy to clean. Tags: craft hobby paint shake mix tool machine electric. Burf Best Answer 9 years ago. Reply Upvote. RobbM6 2 years ago.

I just want to thank everyone, to date, for the great ideas - I'm tinkering, as we speak. SiderAnne 9 years ago.

However, Art, that might work, because the case tumbler uses higher frequency vibration in random directions with respect to the liquid contents of the bottle, similar to the effect of an ultrasonic cleaner, if at a lower frequency. It will shake round or square containers, from a pint to a gallon container, and can accommodate larger European paint containers. Paints ship UPS Ground only. Arctic Tools. We will take any items back within 7 days of purchase as long as the item is returned the same way it was shipped, with all the packing materials.

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker. Покупайте с уверенностью

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Saw a model paint shaker in a hobby supply magazine and thought about using a large electric massager that you buy for your muscle aches and pains. Hold the small bottles of paint on the vibrating surface and you have the same effect. Try it with a clear bottle of flat coat or other liquid and see what patterns work best. The ones in the magazines run over My cordless Dremel and a craft stick is all I need.

Blends even paints that is completely separated back into a smooth usable paint. The paint at the bottom of the jar was pretty thick. I was thinking about this, this morning probably not a good thing, I've had maybe 2 hrs. I have a bowl type vibrating tumble to clean firearms brass. I might take my paint, stir it up a little bit, put the cap on tight, and run it through my tumbler, minus the media. Any thoughts? I use the same method as Hawkeye, haven't had any problems.

Don't know about the tumbler. Model paints bottles are too small for the cavitation effects of shaking to adequately disperse the pigment and binder in the solvent. Art, that might work, because the case tumbler uses higher frequency vibration in random directions with respect to the liquid contents of the bottle, similar to the effect of an ultrasonic cleaner, if at a lower frequency. It's certainly worth a try. Some suggestions: Add appropriate solvent to the bottle and make sure the cap is on very tight.

You might even want to seal it with electrical tape or Parafilm. Otherwise this has less chance of working, and more chance of loosening the caps or even breaking the bottles, not to mention removing the labels. Also, if one or more does open, the media will make cleaning up the resulting mess much easier, and media is much cheaper than a new tumbler.

Ross Martinek A little strangeness, now and then, is a good thing…. Thanks, Triarius. I might give it a try. The one issue that I have is wear on the labels. These are Model Masters enamels. I could write the stock number inside the cap and then just relabel the paint after its shook. I'm getting ready to start a new build. I'm going to pick out the paints that I need and if I can't get them to mix I'll tumble them and post the results.

It looks like I might be able to salvage my paint without using any drastic measures. I stirred them up, and while the paint is still fairly thick, I think that now that the solvent that was in the paint to begin with will have a chance to do it's job. We'll see. Thankfully the tumbler idea is being shut down for now. Next time I need to tumble some brass, I might throw in a bottle or two just outta curiosity.

I quit shaking my paints for one reason: Every time you shake, you throw paint up into the neck of the bottle, onto the inside of the lid, and around the rim of the bottle. Even though you try to wipe it, some remains behind where it dries and can flake back into the paint. I made my own powered mixer with a battery holder, a motor and a push button switch from Radio Shack. You don't need to go to that extreme as a manufactured one is available here:.

My paints last longer as you don't booger up the threads of the jar, their easier to open and no clumps or flakes in the paint..

Of coarse it would be a good idea to filter your paint after mixing those older bottles up as not all those clumps may break up-for that I use these:. Micro-mark strainers. The same reason why I stir my paint--there's less chance of it getting into the threads and "gluing" down the lid. Well said Jim. I use my Badger paint mixer and wouldn't think of using anything else now that I have seen the results. If I am afraid of clumps I use a piece of pantyhose that strains paint just fine and costs very little.

Was'nt there a tip somewhere of a guy who mounted a fishing tackle box, with round slots for the paint bottles , to an old electric orbital sander which rotates the whole shebang and keeps all the paint mixed. This sounded okay to me.

I'll add my vote for stirring, not shaking for all the above reasons. I use the micromark one, cheap and does the job. Just a word of caution if you use this or any electronic stirrer, keep that thing down toward the bottom and make sure its stopped before pulling it out - Unless you want to camo our work room.

I stir my acrylic paint and,before that,my enamels with a toothpick for all the previously stated reasons. It doesn't take long and frequently I can use the toothpick to apply "just the right amount"of paint to small parts, saving cleaning a brush. I have the Badger stirrer and use a toilet paper roll with slits cut on one end about 1. Set the roll over the paint jar and squeeze the slitted end to hold the paint and mix away.

When done, tap the mixer on the jar and pull it up and spin it to sling any left over paint to the inside of the TP roll. Voila French for Wow-cool - no paint on the lip or threads. My Micro-Mark paint stirrer lasted a week or two. Not recommended.

So I kept the stirring shaft, and use it in my Dremel, and it works just great. I guess I do it old school; I both stir and shake by hand. The stirring is to ensure all solids are lifted from the bottom of the bottle I use a toothpick or old piece of sprue.

I then shake to allow the carrier fluid to break down the lumps I'll generally shake for several minutes while reading something. This process also warms the paint while you're gripping it, which is of course desirable as well. This does get paint up onto the cap, but I've always wiped the top of the jar in addition to the inside of the cap with every use, so I've never had problems with stuck lids or dried crunchy things contaminating the paint.

I've resurrected paints that are close to 20 years old doing it this way, often without need to add thinner I'd never consider discarding a paint simply because it's a few years old especially enamel paints As I've gotten older matured, the shaking isn't so much fun, so I've started to experiment with resting the bottom of the bottle against the rubberized pad on my orbital sander without sand paper and that's been working well This is why I don't use the fancy battery-powered paint stirrers.

If I know my luck, I'll hit the button too hard and there's plenty of paint to go around--all around the floor, the walls, the light, me, Jim Barton. I keep a tube from a toilet-paper roll that I place around the paint bottle. I take no credit for this great idea. Someone else on the forum mentioned it and I knicked it. And if you want a cheaper solution to electric stirring, check out your local grocery store. Most of them have a kitchen gadget section.

And they even come in a range of colors. I have a micro-mark stirrer, going on 3 or 4 years now. At one point, it developed a problem with the contact, between the button and the handle.

I had to squeeze like I was choking the life out of it, to get it to work. Then I decided to actually fix the problem. Took a small piece of tinfoil, folded it up, nice and tight, and wedged it between the button and handle, to make a new contact surface. Now the lightest touch has it spinning like an outboard engine.

GIF animations generator gifup. Then I put the bottle s in my ultrasonic cleaner, add water to half the bottle height, and start the cleaner.

Ultrasound loosens and agitates the contents nicely note that old, compacted paints may take a few ultrasonic cycles to loosen up. Nutshell: they will clean almost anything from almost anything, using plain tap water alone no need for soap, solvents, chemicals, etc. The water transmits the untrasound through the glass to the flammable liquid, which does the job safely contained.

Be cautious with flammables, as always. I have the small Testors enamel bottles with. I just made this from a Hamilton Beach electric knife. Knife came with two blades, one of them had a hole in it so I grinded off the teeth, cut some metal straps, made them tight around the jars, drilled hole and bolted it to the blade, straps are snug enough that I don't need restraints for the paint jars.

But WAIT I still have the other blade if I ever need it as a, Electric Knife I just pick up some wooden stirrers every time I go into a coffee shop or fast food place. Costs me nothing the staff don't care I have asked and I get to use them twice - once for each end. I took a "sit and spin" toy from the Goodwill store, and attached a handle to the middle, and those "foam noodles" intended as pool toys around the outside, slit all the way around.

I fill the noodles with bottles of paint, each bottle has two Hematite beads in it,,,,,,,,and just slowly turn the handle as I read or look at decals, etc,,,,,,,,,when I finish, I have all the paints I am going to use all gently shaken tumbled? So far I have found it to be simple cheap and quite adequate.

Model paint shaker

Model paint shaker